A great deal of time has passed since I last wrote a blog post. During that time my partner and I have had a baby (who's now 20 months old) and bought a house, I've started a new job, finished my Ph.D, finished the previously mentioned new job, and started another new job.

The first new job was working for an open source consultancy firm called credativ which is based in Rugby but which, at the time I started, had recently opened a London office. Broadly, they consult on open source software for business. In practice most of the work is using OpenERP, an open source enterprise resource planning (ERP) system written in Python. I was very critical of OpenERP when I started, but I guess this was partly because my unfamiliarity with it led to me often feeling like a n00b programmer again and this was quite frustrating. By the time I finished at credativ I'd learned to understand how to deal with this quite large software system and I now have a better understanding of its real deficiencies: code quality in the core system is generally quite poor, although it has a decent test suite and is consequently functionally fairly sound, the code is scrappy and often quite poorly designed; the documentation is lacking and not very organised; its authors, I find, don't have a sense of what developers who are new to the framework actually need to know. I also found that, during the course of my employment, it took a long time to gain experience of the system from a user's perspective (because I had to spend time doing development work with it); I think earlier user experience would have helped me to understand it sooner. Apart from those things, it seems like a fairly good ERP. Although one other thing I learned working with it (and with business clients in general) is the importance of domain knowledge: OpenERP is about business applications (accounting, customer relations, sales, manufacture) and, it turns out, I don't know anything about any of these things. That makes trying to understand software designed to solve those problems doubly hard. (In all my previous programming experience, I've been working in domains that are much more familiar.)

As well as OpenERP, I've also learned quite a lot about the IT services industry and about having a proper job in general. Really, this was the first proper job I've ever had; I've earned money for years, but always in slightly off-the-beaten-track ways. I've found that team working skills (that great CV cliché) are actually not one of my strong points; I had to learn to ask for help with things, and to share responsibilities with my colleagues. I've learned a lot about customers. It's a very different environment where a lot of your work is reactive; I've previously been used to long projects where the direction is largely self-determined. A lot of the work was making small changes requested by customers. In such cases it's so important to push them to articulate as clearly as possible what they are actually trying to achieve; too often customers will describe a requirement at the wrong level of detail, that is, they'll describe a technical level change. What's much better is if you can get them to describe the business process they are trying to implement so you can be sure the technical change they want is appropriate or specify something better. I've learned quite a bit about managing my time and being productive. We undertook a lot of fixed-price work, where we were required to estimate the cost of the work beforehand. This involves really knowing how long things take which is quite a skill. We also needed to be able to account for all our working time in order to manage costs and stick within budgets for projects. So I learned some more org-mode tricks for managing effort estimates and for keeping more detailed time logs.

My new new job is working back at Goldsmiths (where I did my Ph.D) again, with mostly the same colleagues. We're working on an AHRC-funded project called Transforming Musicology. We have partners at Queen Mary, the Centre for e-Research at Oxford, Oxford Music Faculty, and the Lancaster Institute for Contemporary Arts. The broad aim of the project can be understood as the practical follow-on from my Ph.D: how does the current culture of pervasive networked computing affect what it means to study music and how music gets studied? We're looking for evidence of people using computers to do things which we would understand as musicology, even though they may not. We're also looking at how computers can be integrated into the traditional discipline. And we're working on extending some existing tools for music and sound analysis, and developing frameworks for making music resources available on the Semantic Web. My role is as project manager. I started work at the beginning of October so we've done four days so far. It's mainly been setting up infrastructure (website, wiki, mailing list) and trying to get a good high-level picture of how the two years should progress.

I've also moved my blog from livejournal to here which I manage using Ikiwiki. Livejournal is great; I just liked the idea of publishing my blog using Ikiwiki, writing it in Emacs, and managing it using git. Let's see if I stick to it...